Donkey on Thames Path

Donkey at riverside Surrey Docks Farm on Saturday

Donkey at riverside Surrey Docks Farm on Saturday

Donkeys were on the Thames Path today alongside Surrey Docks Farm near Rotherhithe.

Marlow Museum: Thames exhibition

Marlow’s River: How the Thames shaped our town is the title of a small exhibition at Marlow Museum.

This can be found in Pound Lane opposite Burgers in the High Street.

The exhibition continues until October; open weekends and bank holidays 1-5pm; free.

Meanwhile the Tourist Information Centre has moved into the Library in Institute Road; open Tue-Sat.

Boat Races: Live TV

There is over two hours of live BBC1 TV coverage from the River Thames this afternoon, Saturday 11 April, thanks to the two Boat Races.

Expect  a good commentary from Clare Balding and plenty of shots from the helicopter between Putney and Barnes.

Maybe HMS Stork will get a mention.

 

HMS Stork remembered at Ravilious exhibition

The Ravilious exhibition of 80 watercolours Dulwich Picture Gallery has just two featuring the Thames but both are very interesting.

In 1931 young Eric Ravilious and his wife Tirzah moved into a riverside flat at Hammersmith. The view was of the Thames with Chiswick Eyot directly opposite. It was this view which Eric painted in 1933. The houses have small riverside gardens separated from by the road which in the Thirties was quiet since the residences were not fashionable and were largely occupied by artists.

River Thames at Hammersmith 1933

River Thames at Hammersmith 1933

In River Thames at Hammersmith 1933 the towpath bank opposite looks even more rural than today.

But the most arresting of the two Thames pictures is one called The Stork at Hammersmith 1932.

The Stork was not a pub but fifty year old HMS Stork which was anchored in the river upstream of Hammersmith Bridge to serve as a training ship for boys interested in a Naval career.

It had been a landmark since squeezing under Hammersmith Bridge in 1913 and remained a gently moving landmark until 1950. Its arrival was not welcomed but its loss was like the Pool of London having to say farewell to HMS Belfast.

The Stork at Hammersmith 1932

The Stork at Hammersmith 1932

Among items on show is a letter addressed to fellow student Helen Binyon at ‘Streatley Berks’. This suggests more Thames associations but, although this is Streatley opposite Goring, the farmhouse is some way from the River Thames.

Ravilious is at Dulwich Picture Gallery until Bank Holiday Monday 31 August; open Tue-Sun admission £12.50 (OAP £11.50; student £6).

Garden Bridge judicial review appeal

Many reasons have been put forward for thinking again about building the Garden Bridge across the River Thames.

The crossing would link the South Bank, near the Oxo Tower, with Temple in the City of London.

The huge and unexpected cost to the public purse as well as the need to fell trees to build a bridge carrying trees are just some of the problems raised.

Above all  there is the question of whether the fine natural stretch of water at Kings Reach should be spoilt by a new structure.

The decision by Lambeth Council to allow the bridge to be built is being challenged in the High Court.

The bill for the appeal will be around £24,000 and so far a quarter has been raised.

“If all the thousands of people who have signed petitions against the bridge gave a few pounds I would have all the costs covered,” says Waterloo Community Development Group director Michael Ball who successfully requested the judicial review.

A number of people have given £5 just to be part of the effort.

You can donate online here.

The background and views can be read in The Independent, The ObserverDaily Mail and The Times.

Magna Carta 800: Meadow, island or priory?

King John depicted in Egham

King John depicted in Egham

 

This spring is a best time to walk the Thames Path on Runnymede near Egham for this summer there will be a growing focus on Magna Carta 800.

The document was agreed by King John and his discontented barons at Runnymede in 1215. It is taken as the start of the rule of law and the later foundation for the USA constitution.

On the morning of Monday 15 June this summer the Queen will be at Runnymede with representatives of not only the USA but other countries including India which look to Magna Carta as a guideline for the rule of law.

The River Thames, mentioned in the document, is not just the backdrop to the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta events but the road linking key places involved the story.

In Wallingford the big year was 2013 for that was the 800th anniversary of an early meeting between the hated King John and the barons.

Appropriately, in the 18th century the town became the home of jurist Sir William Blackstone who published the first study of the charter.

If now in 2015 we look back in real time we see the King and barons negotiating at the Temple on the north bank of the Thames in London.

Sometimes John moved downstream to the Tower of London.

Another centre of activity was the new official residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury, Lambeth Palace. There Archbishop Stephen Langton was the vital link in bringing the two sides together.

He was at Runnymede on Monday 15 June 1215 when King John arrived from nearby Windsor Castle to assent to demands for freedom from arbitrary rule.

The barons were camped on similar lammas ground on the west side of Staines. They are thought to have moved west early in the morning to Ankerwycke Priory on the north bank opposite Runnymede.

Ankerwyck on the Wraysbury bank

Ankerwycke on the Wraysbury bank

This is not surprising for Lord de Mountfitchet, one of the barons, was lord of the manor of Wraysbury and his father had founded the Benedictine Priory. Mountfitchet probably introduced the other 24 barons to the prioress and sisters.

Did some attend Mass there on what they hoped would be a crucial day in the struggle for freedom? Did they have breakfast at the priory?

Today, for the first time in decades thanks to the National Trust and its volunteers, it is again possible to stand on the Runnymede riverbank in Surrey and see the remains of the priory buildings across the water in Buckinghamshire. JM Turner stood there in 1811 to sketch the original clear view.

Ankerwycke Priory can now be seen from the Thames Path

Ankerwycke Priory can now be seen from the Thames Path

The King’s assent on Monday 15 June to his seal being later affixed to Magna Carta was probably signified when he kissed the Archbishop.

The document reads “given by our hand in the meadow that is called Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines”.

But the actual spot is unknown. The stone erected by the American Bar Association is on rising ground at the foot of Cooper’s Hill.

Magna Carta monument on Runnymede

Magna Carta monument on Runnymede

Many claim that the barons did not ride cross the river at the end of Wraysbury’s Magna Carta Lane but welcomed the King to Ankerwycke where the already ancient Ankerwycke Yew, pre-dating Christ, offered a special spot for a solemn act.

Ankerwycke Tree

Ankerwycke Tree

Another alternative is Magna Carta Island which is now hardly discernible near the north bank a few yards upstream. The gap from the Wraysbury bank is now too narrow to be navigable. A house, complete with a ‘charter room’, was built on the west end by Magna Carta Lane in 1834.

House on Magna Carta Island

House on Magna Carta Island

It has been suggested that the King based himself for an hour or so on Runnymede whilst the barons were at Ankerwycke Priory. The ‘neutral’ ground for formal agreement was the island.

The north bank or island may have been a better proposition since in June 1215 Runnymede, owned by downstream Chertsey Abbey, was a meadow with tall grass having not been grazed since early February. The barons were there for a further five days until Friday and would have needed feeding so the overcrowded priory offered handy facilities.

Egham, to the south east of Runnymede, claims to be ‘historic’ and home of Magna Carta. The High street has a statue and a fountain. But there is no evidence that King John or any the barons ever visited.

However, Egham did play a crucial role in saving the historic meadow for us.

In 1921 there were plans to sell the ground for bungalows. Albert Tranter, vicar of Egham, joined lawyer Helen Normanton and the Marquess of Lincolnshire to form the Magna Carta Society. The vicar threatened any auctioneer attempting to sell the historic site with being thrown into the Thames and as a result the Minister of Agriculture intervened to halt the sale.

Magna Carta Tearoom's third of a pint milk bottle

Magna Carta Tearoom’s third of a pint milk bottle

The National Trust Magna Carta Tearoom makes a good end to the walk out of Egham. To find a bus stop for the 71 to return to Egham Station continue upstream to the nearby Bells of Ouseley.

Ankerwycke Priory and Yew, now also in the care of the NT, can be reached from Wraysbury Station. The village is planning celebrations for eve of Magna Carta Day.

Putney Sea Scouts fear losing riverside hut

Putney Sea Scouts cleaning the Beverley Brook.

Putney Sea Scouts cleaning the Beverley Brook.

After forty years Putney Sea Scouts are in danger of losing their riverside site.

Landlord Wandsworth Council is not renewing the lease as it wants the Scout building to be shared with a learning disability project.

Scout leaders deem the building to be too small for sharing following an attempt at using the same facilities together.

The Scout hut has a front door at the start of the towpath by the bridge over Beverley Brook which once marked the London-surrey boundary. The stream runs to one side of the high up hut and offers opportunities for water activities.

The view across the Thames is to Fulham Football ground.

The Scout hut was built by the scouts after fundraising but Wandsworth Council intends taking possession on 17 July with the scouts using it under licence.

The next riverside Scout site is at Petersham in the next borough.

Potters Fields: Sundial on Thames Path

Mark Chapman of More London (left), The Mayor of Southwark and Max Nicholson

Mark Chapman of More London (left), The Mayor of Southwark and Piers Nicholson

A sundial has been placed on the Thames Path across the water from the Tower of London.

The timepiece has been designed by Piers Nicholson, the son of conservationist Max Nicholson who died in 2003.

This stretch of the Thames Path in front of Potters Fields is also part of the Queen’s Silver Jubilee Walkway which Her Majesty opened in Jubilee Year 1977.

The sundial commemorates both the walkway inauguration and Max Nicholson who founded the William Curtis Ecological Park, the UK’s first urban ecological park, which was on the site of City Hall and the More London development from 1978 to 1983.

The Mayor of Southwark Sunil Chopra officially received the sundial on site for public enjoyment on Thursday morning.

Minutes afterwards there was a tree planting a few feet away on Potters Fields lawn to replace a diseased

tree.

In 1977 neither the riverside path nor the Thames Path existed. The Jubilee Walkway route here was via Tooley Street and the future ecological garden was a lorry park.

William Curtis (1746–1799) was a botanist who is commemorated upstream in Battersea’s riverside church.

 

A tourist photographs the new sundial

A tourist photographs the new sundial

pf tree

OXFORD: Path diversion

There is a temporary diversion in Oxford from Monday 9 March.

Just upstream of Folly Bridge there will be work on the footbridge carrying the towpath over the main Bulstake Stream channel.

DIVERSION DIRECTIONS:
Go over the Gas Bridges to follow Castle Mill Stream.
At Oxpends Road go left to walk as far as Park End Street.
Turn left to go under the railway by Oxford Station and reach Osney Bridge.

The towpath should reopen by Easter in early April.

Magna Carta 800: Travelodge at Egham

A Travelodge has opened at Egham just in time for the Magna Carta 800 celebrations on nearby Runnymede in June.

This will be handy for walkers as it is in the town centre, next to the new Waitrose, and near the station.

The best approach to the Thames Path is to walk down Hummer Road and across Runnymede.

Travelodge Egham is in Church Road.

 

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