Tudor boats, a prime minister and saxophonists

If you are on the Thames Path in London this Saturday you may see the Tudor river pageant making its way upstream.
The Royal Shallop ‘Jubilant’ will leave the Tower of London at 10am for Hamptob Court. On board will be people dressed as Henry VIII, one of his wives and courtiers. It will be accompanied by a flotilla of traditional shallops and cutters.
It is all to celebrate the 500th anniversary of Henry VIII’s accession. I am not sure there is much to celebrate since he destroyed so much. I see that the Queen has marked the death of Henry VII instead.
If you stay in the Pool of London you can see the Morgan Tsvangirai, prime minister of Zimbabwe, who is visiting Southwark Cathedral at 1pm.
On Sunday, which is Midsummer’s Day, 800 saxophonists will come together on London Bridge for a musical fanfare marking the 800th anniversary of the first stone-built London Bridge. They are expected to arrive just after midday. www.sustainmusic.org
If you are on the Thames Path in London this Saturday you may see the Tudor river pageant making its way upstream.
The Royal Shallop ‘Jubilant’ will leave the Tower of London at 10am for Hampton Court. On board will be people dressed as Henry VIII, one of his wives and courtiers. They will be accompanied by a flotilla of traditional shallops and cutters.
It is all to celebrate the 500th anniversary of Henry VIII’s accession. I am not sure there is much to celebrate since he destroyed so much. I see that the Queen has marked the death of Henry VII instead.
If you stay in the Pool of London you can see the Morgan Tsvangirai, prime minister of Zimbabwe, who is visiting Southwark Cathedral at 1pm.
On Sunday, which is Midsummer’s Day, 800 saxophonists will come together on London Bridge for a musical fanfare marking the 800th anniversary of the first stone-built London Bridge. They are expected to arrive just after midday.
See pages 29-31 and 67.

A new look at Thames pubs

Last weekend’s Summer pubs guide which came in two parts with The Guardian and the Observer featured several Thames pubs. Nearly all were ones which I have considered to have been spoilt over the last thirty years.
But the reviews make interesting reading. Most encouraging is the description of The Olde Bell at Hurley where walkers are mentioned along with homemade pork pies and lemonade. I have avoided the place for some years but maybe it’s time I went back.
I love long lunches but when walking it’s often important to be able to have a simple lunch and move on after about an hour without being trapped by the slow service of a three course meal.
Both The Perch and The Trout above Oxford get a mention. The best one is probably The Dove at Hammersmith although it is on the wrong side of the river, opposite the towpath but worth crossing Hammersmith Bridge.
Last weekend’s Summer pubs guide which came in two parts with The Guardian and The Observer featured several Thames pubs. Nearly all were ones which I have considered to have been spoilt over the last thirty years.
But the reviews make interesting reading. Most encouraging is the description of The Olde Bell at Hurley where walkers are mentioned along with homemade pork pies and lemonade. I have avoided the place for some years but maybe it’s time I went back.
I love long lunches but when walking it’s often important to be able to have a simple lunch and move on after about an hour without being trapped by the slow service of a three course meal.
Both The Perch and The Trout above Oxford get a mention.
The best one is probably The Dove at Hammersmith although it is on the wrong side of the river, opposite the towpath but worth crossing Hammersmith Bridge.

Old Battersea House

The Forbes family is selling some of the pictures in Old Battersea House which was restored by the late Malcolm Forbes. He paid a peppercorn rent to Wandsworth Council in return for a massive restoration. The house can be seen peeping above  a wall across the road from the Thames Path between Battersea Old Church and Battersea Railway Bridge.

I see that I claim that the house dates from 1899. This is nonsense. It’s more like 1699. How did I miss that one?

Although much restored after long neglect, the house is at least late 17th-century.

It’s good to know that it is now in good shape. The Evening Standard says that Prince Charles’ art students visit for sketching.